Direct Walk up Yr Eifl from Llithfaen 5/5 (2)

Route Summary:

Probably the best walk you can complete in just over an hour in North Wales (if you’re fast!)

Distance
Ascent
Time
3.4 km270 m1hr 30min

Calculate the time using Naismith’s Rule and factor in your own pace.

Start and Finish: Llithfaen

Facilities:

Pub (Y Fic) and shop in Llithfaen a well as a cafe down in Nant Gwrtheyrn.

Hazards:

Some steep ground on this route.

Remember that we cannot outline every single hazard on a walk – it’s up to you to be safe and competent. Read up on Mountain Safety , Navigation and what equipment you’ll need.

Public Transport: Traveline for UK Public Transport
Parking and Post Code for Sat Nav (where applicable): 

Free parking at the start – usually no problems parking.

Weather Forecast:

Check out our Best Mountain Weather Forecast?

Direct Walk up Yr Eifl from Llithfaen Route Map and GPX Download

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 Guidebooks:

Summits and Places on this Route

Places Nearby



Direct Walk up Yr Eifl from Llithfaen Details

While we’ve already got a perfectly good walk across the three peaks of Yr Eifl, we thought it was worth adding this more direct route. This route takes a beeline from the carpark, quite directly to the summit and is enough to fill an hour or two on an afternoon, depending on your level of fitness. Whil we descened the same way, you could just as esily descend to Bwlch yr Eifl to the north west, or towards Tre’r Ceiri to the south east.

1 From the car park, cross the road and head in an easterly direction, rather than the direction suggested by the signpost which takes you further south than you need to go. If you do follow this, then there are so many paths criss-crossing the moorland that it’s easy enough to take one of the paths back towards the main track.

yr_eifl_ (1 of 1)-2

2 The path climbs gently initially, and the track is wide and easy to follow.

Yr_eifl_ (5 of 6)

3 After just under 1km, the path starts to steepen, and while the going is excellent, it is a proper mountain path and requires the usual care. It can be unclear from a distance where the path continues, as the heather is deep, but it’s always easy to follow. If you find the path’s not clear and distinct, you’ve most certainly lost it.

Yr_eifl_ (1 of 2)

4 Finally, the path pulls up for the final 100m or so of ascent, a bit more steeply. The summit soon appears to your right, clearly marked by a large 4 on top of the trig point. We haven’t a clue what this 4 stands for.

yr_eifl_ (4 of 4)

5 Enjoy the view! It’s extensive, and being so close to the sea you feel much higher than 564m. Views extend down the Llyn Peninsula and into Snowdonia, as well as a bird’s eye view into Tre’r Ceiri across the valley.

Yr_eifl_ (1 of 6)

6 Descend the way you came – with the descent not being totally obvious. If you look at the cairn below with the H to the left, then the descent path can be found by passing the left of the trig point as seen below and the path is found clearly once you’re off the rocks. Someone’s even gone to the effort of putting little stone stacks along the path.

Yr_eifl_ (2 of 6)

If you still feel energetic, then you can always pop down to Nant Gwrtheyrn along the Coastal Path to visit the cafe. However, remember that you’ll be starting off at 300m and descending to sea level, so it’ll be more of an excursion than Yr Eifl!



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