Trion:Z Dual Loop Bracelet review No ratings yet.

Athletes are known for trying all sorts of alternative ideas in order to improve their luck, and the methods used have ranged from the unusual to the downright barmy. Superstitious cricketer, Neil McKenzie had to insist all the toilet seats were down in the dressing room before venturing out onto the field, not to mention the bad luck associated with the score of 111 and multiples thereof (the Nelson). Many more cricketers have their lucky hankies while Michael Jordan chose to wear lucky shorts. So is the current trend of magnetised wrist wear the latest development for superstitious athletes or is it something more?

The Trion:Z is a magnetised sport bracelet that is:

“Designed to balance the body’s magnetic and electrical fields, Trion:Z combines the therapeutic properties of magnets and negative ions, bringing you the most powerful complementary health product on the market today”.

It is worn by athletes such as recent US Open winner Rory McIlroy and in-form England swing bowler, James Anderson, who’s clearly going to be more popular in the dressing room than the erstwhile McKenzie. It works by utilising magnetic thereapy, and the theory behind it is explained on their site as “when a magnet is placed around a specific joint or body part, more blood is attracted to that area, leading to an increase in oxygen and nutrients. The combination of increased oxygen and nutrients leads to a faster healing process.”  Neither is it a new fashion, as it has been about since Egyptian times and is recognised as a complimentary therapy in many countries around the world.

So does this help the average recreational runner with their performance and balance? Well it was timely that I received my Trion:Z Dual Loop, as I’ve been suffering with extremely poor balance after seriously spraining my left ankle last August on Snowdon. While I’ve tried a wobble board for a while, I’m just not the indoor exercise sort of person, so something that promised to help with little effort on my part had to be given a go.

“89% of consumers reported that they felt a noticeable difference from Trion:Z products”

Citizen Smith style – Power to the People!

I did, and still do, wear it on runs and hill walks for nearly two months and while its impossible to prove that there’s any benefit, I’ve had some pretty decent runs in that time and felt that my balance while trail running and for downhill fell has improved. This could be luck, it could be the bracelet. As someone who despises wearing any item such as watches and jewellery, I was concerned that this would really bother me on my wrist. However, it is an extremely comfortable fit, and you don’t realise you’re wearing it. It looks smart as well, and mine came in a colour that matches my Garmin 305, which was unintentional, but not clashing is always good right?

Running is 90 percent mental and the rest is physical – unknown..

Sometimes, you just get one of those runs, you just can’t get your head around what you need to do and every kilometre is painful. Other days, you just know what you need to do, and you do it, with little effort, you’re just in the zone. There’s a definite mental aspect to running that, while probably not 90% of the whole, is certainly a significant part of it. If wearing this gives you a mental boost, then that part of your running should be less of a challenge and you’ll enjoy your run more.

If you visit the Amazon store, then you can get an idea of whether this works or not, with a mix of those who praise it with their aches and pains gone in days to those who claim it did nothing. Whether it works because of the magnetic therapy, or the placebo effect, I can’t say, but it may well be worth a punt and i’ll keep on wearing it for my marathon training just in case! It’s certainly better than a lucky pair of kecks, certainly more hygienic and your mates won’t keep giving you a wide berth at the bar afterwards.

Summary: Magnetic therapy bracelet that is intended to improve your balance and performance.

What’s good: Comfortable and stylish and certainly worth a punt considering the testimonials on the site and on Amazon.

Not so good: If you don’t do alternative therapies and you’re a sceptic, then probably not for you.

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