Personally, I like to take some cash with me on a run. Often, I may be running a linear route with an arranged pickup at the end, or I may just need a bail out option for those longer runs when you just don’t feel 100% before setting off. I’ve stashed cash into my mobile case, even inside the phone itself before now, as well as in a small waist pouch. It was from this latter one that I lost a rather large note, whipped from the pouch at thw point known only to me as Windy Corner, exactly 1KM from home. It was well into the Menai Straits before I realised it wasn’t a receipt.

It was only whilst looking for a compact lighter that I came across the CoinStash and CashStash by TrueUtility, who also do a nifty FireStash lighter, both keyring attachments to carry coins and notes respectively. They also come in a handy hard-case that’s promoted as a free case that might be handy to keep notes and small items dry.

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The CoinStash holds 5 pound coins comfortably and securely, though it wouldn’t quite close for me with six coins. The only issue is that five coins by their nature will be a tad heavy, and this can be a bit much if you’re putting it into a tiny pocket on running shorts.

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The CashStash takes a note of any denomination and stashes it securely within, with an o-ring ensuring it’s also watertight. You do need to coil the note appropriately, but this isn’t difficult and you get an instruction sheet if you can’t work it out yourself. This looks like a £20 when you open the capsule up for the first time, and you’ll think your luck’s in until you realise it’s not free cash. Use a brand new note to make it easier still. It may be a bit of a pain to get the money out again, and you’ll get some strange looks at the bar, but you know it’ll be there securely when you want it. Neither does it weigh much, and you can carry this and a house key in just about any pair of shorts. I was initially worried that it would open in use, but it’s been used and abused over months and not even hinted at coming loose.

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Over the course of three months, they’ve been on wild camps, long runs and walks, as well as just being on my day to day keyring for the entire time. I’ve had a lot of use from the CoinStash, and it is something you’d be using from day to day while the CashStash really is more of an emergency item. The items themselves are light and well made, though are obviously starting to show a patina of wear on the aircraft grade aluminium, as you’d expect from being in a pocket with a bunch of keys for the last three months or so.

All in all, we can’t recommend these highly enough. The only problem I have is keeping the CoinStash stocked up with coins!

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