Walk up The Easains from Tulloch Station

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Route Summary:

A quiet ascent up a pair of Munros alongside Loch Treig.

Distance
Ascent
Time
28.11 km 1363 m Allow 8 hours or more

Calculate the time using Naismith’s Rule and factor in your own pace.

Start and Finish: Tulloch Station

Facilities:

None on route.

Hazards:

Usual Munro territory! Faint paths, steep ground needing care and good navigational skills. The walk from the railway station at Tulloch is lengthy – but most of that is easy road walking.

Remember that we cannot outline every single hazard on a walk – it’s up to you to be safe and competent. Read up on Mountain Safety , Navigation and what equipment you’ll need.

Public Transport:

Railway from Glasgow / Fort William

Traveline for UK Public Transport
Parking and Post Code for Sat Nav (where applicable): PH31 4AR

The route uses the train, but you can park at Fersit where there’s a large parking area.

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Walk up The Easains from Tulloch Station Route Map and GPX Download

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Guidebooks:

Summits and Places on this Route

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Walk up The Easains from Tulloch Station Details

The Munros of Stob Coire Easain and the slightly lower Stob a’ Choire Mheadhoin, known as the Easains, can be ascended in a long day from Tulloch Station, or significantly shorter if you park near Fersit – down to a more respectable 17km. They’re a pleasant pair of Munros that provide excellent views into the Grey Corries, the Mamores and towards the remote hills surrounding Corrour. We recommend checking out the official West Highland Line website in order to plan your route and ensure you’ve plenty of time to catch the final train back. You can base yourself in Corrour, catching the train to Tulloch and returning to Corrour by descending to the Lairig Leacach path or down the Irlich Chaoile ridge to meet the path nearer Corrour.

The Easains – Stob Coire Easain and Stob a’ Choire Mheadhoin from Tulloch Station Route Description

1 Starting from the station – follow the minor road and then the A82 westwards along the grass verge until you see the junction for Fersit to the left – signposted 2.5 miles! Follow this minor road, for, well, 2.5 miles!

Walk up The Easains from Tulloch Station

2 From the junction at Fersit, follow the track ahead (the left junction takes you to Fersit) towards Loch Treig. Follow this track alongside the River Treig for 2km before taking a junction right. Head on this roughly NW for around half a kilometre, with the track giving way to a path that’s often boggy and then veers south west towards the Easain’s broad North Eastern ridge. There’s a hydro pillar here – so you’ll know you’re on the right track!

3 Continue SW along the broad ridge, heading for the steep summit of Meall Cian Dearg. It’s actually the end of the ridge, rather than a summit, and a steep path leads up through the crags and onto the wider ridge above.

4 One of the pleasures of Munro bagging is when you know you’ve left the less pleasant and boggy lowland behind and the terrain underfoot finally feels like a proper mountain! The first section is pleasantly steady, before the route picks up the pace after a kilometre or so with the final ascent to Stob a’ Choire Mheadhoin, for the first ascent of the day!

5 There’s a fair old drop to the bealach, which is why these count as two Munros (and your legs might protest) despite being so close together. It’s all straightforward enough as you reascend to the second Munro of the day – Stob Coire Easain. The views from both summits extend to the Grey Corries and the Mamores, with the eye being drawn across Loch Treig to Chno Dearg and Stob Coire Sgriodain.

You may or may not be glad to know that you’ll need to re-climb Stob a’ Choire Mheadhoin (another punishing 150m reascent) before retracing your steps back to the start.

For those looking for an alternative route – you can descend Stob Coire Easain to the west, which is even less frequented than the ascent route! With care, once the steep ground has been traversed, head downhill towards the Lairig Leacach track and follow that track down to Spean Bridge. Or you can spend the night at the Lairig Leacach Bothy. This option is ideal if you’re concerned about the distance of this route if you’re doing it by train – especially if based in Fort William as a taxi from Spean Bridge won’t break the bank. Even better is spending the night out among the mountains in a bothy, just ensure you’ve got your wee dram stashed away in preparation!

Dave Roberts

Dave Roberts founded Walk Eryri in 2004, with the aim of providing routes that are off the beaten track. Walk Eryri is now part of Mud and Routes which continues to provide more off beat routes and walks in Snowdonia and beyond. Dave has been exploring the hills of Eryri for over thirty years, and is a qualified Mountain Leader.
Dave also established Walk up Snowdon, Walk up Scafell Pike and Walk up Ben Nevis just to mention a few.

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