Walk up Meall a’Bhuachaille from Glenmore Lodge

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Route Summary:

An easy ascent and descent on good paths with excellent summit views to the Northern Corries and across Strathspey.

Distance
Ascent
Time
9.1 km504 m3-4 hours

Calculate the time using Naismith’s Rule and factor in your own pace.

Start and Finish: The parking area just beyond the entrance to Glenmore Lodge.

Facilities:

Cafés and toilets at Glenmore. Ryvoan bothy on route for shelter

Hazards:

Between June and September, the Highland midge can really spoil your day if you are not well-protected. There are various products available but Smidge seems to be effective for most people.

Remember that we cannot outline every single hazard on a walk – it’s up to you to be safe and competent. Read up on Mountain Safety , Navigation and what equipment you’ll need.

Public Transport:

No. 31 bus from Aviemore stops at Glenmore and the walk could be started and finished there.

Traveline for UK Public Transport
Parking and Post Code for Sat Nav (where applicable): Not applicable

Free, limited parking at start/finish

Weather Forecast:

MetOffice Braeriach forecast, MWIS Cairngorms forecast

Check out our Best Mountain Weather Forecast?

Walk up Meall a’Bhuachaille from Glenmore Lodge Route Map and GPX Download

Download the GPX File

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Guidebooks:

Summits and Places on this Route

Places Nearby:

 



Walk up Meall a’Bhuachaille from Glenmore Lodge Details

If you are in the area but only have a few hours to spare then this walk up the Corbett of Meall a’Bhuachaille is THE walk to do. A straightforward ascent and descent along with excellent views from the summit make this a popular year-round route.

Walk up Walk up Meall a’Bhuachaille

From Aviemore take the B970 signed Coylumbridge. Pass Loch Morlich on the right and after the Glenmore visitor centre, turn left onto the single track road which leads to Glenmore Lodge. Park at the end of the road near the disused garages.  At weekends and holidays arrive early, as space is limited.

Join the good path signed ‘Old Logging Way’ which drops down to the road at the Reindeer Centre. Cross the track straight ahead and walk round to the right, passing the Norwegian Commando Memorial.

Ignore the bridges on the left

Walk round the left side of the visitor centre and ignore the two bridges on the left. Go straight ahead and pick up the path signed ‘Meall a’Bhuachaille’

Take this path

Continue uphill ignoring paths to the left and right, eventually coming out onto the open hillside.

Exit the forest

The path now begins to climb more steeply as it heads towards the saddle between Creagan Gorm and Meall a’Bhuachaille.

At the ridge, turn right and begin the final ascent to the summit.

Creagan Gorm and Craiggowrie from the summit
The Northern Corries and Cairn Gorm

The large summit cairn and shelter provide some protection if required but you will probably be more interested in enjoying the expansive views in all directions. To the north and west, Strathspey and the ridge to Creagan Gorm and Craiggowrie. To the north-east Abernethy forest  and to the south, the Northern Corries and Munros of the Cairngorms.

From the summit take the path heading east and continue as it winds its way downhill.

An Lochain Uaine comes into view and we will visit it later on.

An Lochain Uaine

The path finishes at the Ryvoan bothy which stands adjacent to the old packhorse track between Glenmore and Nethy Bridge. It is a good spot to rest and take some refreshments before continuing the descent.

Ryvoan bothy

From the bothy, turn south along the track and continue downhill, soon re-entering the forest.

Continue downhill

After ten minutes or so you will reach An Lochain Uaine, the green lake, where it is said the colour of the water is due to the fairies washing their clothes in it. It is a good place to cool hot feet or for your four legged companion to maybe rescue a stick or two!

‘The Green Lake’

Having enjoyed the delights of the lake, rejoin the path, ignore marked paths on the left and right and continue to reach the start/finish of the route.

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