Pembrokeshire Coastal Path Section 1- Amroth to Tenby No ratings yet.

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11 km305 m

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Pembrokeshire Coastal Path Section 1- Amroth to Tenby Route Map and GPX Download

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Pembrokeshire Coastal Path Section 1- Amroth to Tenby Details

Day one of the Pembrokeshire Coastal path from Amroth to Tenby. Walking the first section of this path over a couple of days was a right mixed bag. Starting in Amroth at the southern end of the National Trail, I felt optimistic. You are on the sea shore, and despite the road it feels good. You can see as far as Caldey Island, but you know that the nearer Monkstone Point is the main target of the day before ambling down to Tenby.

Route StartAmrothOS Map RequiredPublic Transport Bus Services
Route EndDinbych y PysgodDifficulties? n/aFacilitiesPlenty en route

The’path’ then continued along the coastal road into Amroth itself and at the far end you felt the path was starting properly as you pull up into the trees. This feeling doesn’t last long as you’re then down through the suburbs of Wiseman Bridge and follow what amounts to a pedestrian road along the track of an old ore railway on the Miner’s Walk. It’s pleasant enough, but not what walking’s about for me. It’s all noisy holiday makers, you may as well be walking through a town anywhere. Through some tunnels, and you reach the busy seaside town of Saundersfoot. It began to rain, and had i found a bus, i’d have caught it to Tenby and given up.

Thankfully, i couldn’t find one and continued up the hill to the right of the harbour and the path was waymarked down through an estate of houses. We were pretty wet by this point, but once out of the houses realised that this is where the walk starts to feel like a coastal walk.

A mere 11km on the map, but with the ups and downs continually slowing us made it more difficult. Wet mud in the woods also made going difficult, but afforded some good shelter from the rain. In one of these valleys about a kilometer from Saundersfoot, we had a graphic display of how close this area really is to civilisation. Someone had left tent poles, rubbish and firemarks along with a tarp. It was raining too much to photograph.

Finally, Monkstone point was reached, and had I the time and the weather better would have descended to the pretty beach. Onwards we went instead, looking suspiciously at the hills that seemed to block our way to Dinbych-y-Pysgod. They did. Three minor ascents, including Monkstone Point, along predominantly muddy tracks with an eight year old doesn’t make for a fast walk.

Still, we were only damp. So the real rain showers opened up and a proper rainstorm saw us wet through. So heads down, and on to Tenby after a day I wished i’d gone to the pub. Not the most inspiring walk until you reach Rhode Wood, where beyond that it would have been a pleasant walk were it not for the rain!



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1 Comment
  1. chris moody 8 years ago

    hi

    the coastal path is great for all the family if you need somewhere to stop off on the way try http://www.kilnpark.com for latest offers and short breaks

     

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