Dinas Island and Pen y Fan Walk  No ratings yet.

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Route Summary:

A short, intense coastal walk on the North Pembrokeshire coast with views, high clifftops and a beach side pub to finish.

Distance
Ascent
Time
4.93 km 188 m 1 hour 30 minutes

Calculate the time using Naismith’s Rule and factor in your own pace.

Start and Finish: Pwllgwaelod car park

View Facilities

The Old Sailors Pub at Pwllgwaelod with public toilets at both Pwllgwaelod and Cwm-yr-eglwys

View Hazards
 

Some sections are close to clifftops and you’ll need a head for heights! There’s an easier path to avoid these sections in most cases.

Remember that we cannot outline every single hazard on a walk – it’s up to you to be safe and competent. Read up on Mountain Safety , Navigation and what equipment you’ll need.

Parking :

Parking at Pwllgwaelod and Cwm-yr-eglwys (National Trust)

Public Transport:

The 404 Strumble Shuttle St Davids to Fishguard bus stops at nearby Dinas Cross, which is a 1.5km walk to the start.

Traveline for UK Public Transport

Weather Forecast:

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Dinas Island and Pen y Fan Walk Route Map and GPX Download

Download file for GPS

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Guidebooks:

Summits and Places on this Route

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Dinas Island and Pen y Fan Walk Details

This circular walk follows the Pembrokeshire Coast Path from Pwllgwaelod around the headland of Ynys Dinas / Dinas Island. The walk takes you up the coastal hill of Pen y Fan (not to be confused with the ‘other’ Pen y Fan in South Wales!) that marks the highest point of Dinas Head along high cliffs, with some sections of exposure that require a head for heights. While it may not be as tall as it’s namesake, not reaching 150m in height, the northern slopes/cliffs fall direct into the sea and provide a lofty viewpoint from which to take in some stunning coastal views. It is often simply called Dinas Head, even if that’s technically the northernmost point of Dinas Island rather than the name of the hill.

The 5km walk starts off from the coastal hamlet of Pwllgwaelod, wasting no time in climbing up the high cliffs on the way to Pen y Fan. The views into Bae Abergwaun / Fishguard Bay soon open up as you gain height. The going eases as you reach the trig point at the 142m high summit of Pen y Fan, with views to be enjoyed inland towards the Preseli, along the coast and the distinctive Carn Ingli above Newport.

In descent, an easier path can be followed through the pastures, but the coast path sticks close to the clifftops, descending closer to the sea and finding more exposure as it finds the best views over Pwll Glas and Needle Rock on the way down to Cwm-yr-eglwys. This is a tiny hamlet, with only 4 permanent residents, where you can see the ruins of St Brynach church. It was first damaged in storms during 1850-51, with the graveyard so damaged that human remains were exposed, and finally destroyed in the Great Charter storm of 1859. A good path leads from Cwm-yr-eglwys along the flat valley bottom to return back to Pwllgwaelod. If it’s not too busy, it’s worth spending some time at the beach here as well as making the most of the hospitality offered by the The Old Sailors Pub which is found practically on the beach!

Wales Coast Path on Dinas Head The path descends to a gate, and then divides – for the adventurous it drops down to skirt the cliff top for a view of Needle Rock, the island just off the headland which is a haven for birds, Those of a more nervous disposition can take the high path along a field margin.

More information on the National Trust Website.

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Dave Roberts

Dave Roberts founded Walk Eryri in 2004, with the aim of providing routes that are off the beaten track. Walk Eryri is now part of Mud and Routes which continues to provide more off beat routes and walks in Snowdonia and beyond. Dave has been exploring the hills of Eryri for over thirty years, and is a qualified Mountain Leader. Dave also established Walk up Snowdon, Walk up Scafell Pike and Walk up Ben Nevis just to mention a few.

More Articles by Dave Roberts

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